Land & property transfer tax calculator Canada

Land & property transfer tax calculator Canada

When you buy a home, condo or other property in Canada, you’ll have to pay some type of fee to transfer ownership. The amount charged is usually based on the property’s value. Most provinces charge a certain percentage of land transfer tax, while others only charge transfer and registration fees (which end up costing much less).

LowestRates.ca’s calculator will help you estimate how big your tax bill will be in every province that charges land transfer taxes. Keep scrolling to learn more about the tax rates and fees in every province and territory.

How to calculate land transfer tax

Total tax: $

Breakdown
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Provincial tax

$

Municipal tax

$

Rebate

$

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Land transfer tax by province and city

 

Ontario land transfer tax

Ontario’s land transfer tax is charged at a marginal rate, which means the amount within each bracket of the home’s purchase price is taxed at an incremental percentage.

Foreign nationals, foreign corporations and taxable trustees must pay an additional non-resident speculation tax of 15%, which applies to properties in the Greater Golden Horseshoe Region.

Purchase priceMarginal tax rate
Up to $55,0000.5%
$55,001 to $250,0001%
$250,001 to $400,0001.5%
$400,001 to $2,000,0002%
$2,000,001 and up2.5%

Ontario first-time homebuyer land transfer tax refund

If you’re a first-time homebuyer, you may qualify for a refund on part or all of the Ontario land transfer tax. The maximum refund is $4,000. You can claim an immediate refund when you register the conveyance (the transfer of property from one person to another), or up to 18 months after the registration date.

To be eligible for Ontario’s land transfer tax refund for first-time homebuyers, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident
  • You must be at least 18 years old
  • You must live in the home within nine months of buying it
  • You cannot have previously owned a home, or any ownership interest in a home, anywhere in the world
  • If you have a spouse, your spouse cannot have owned a home anywhere in the world during the time you’ve been married
 

Toronto land transfer tax

If you buy a home within the City of Toronto, you’ll have to pay a double land transfer tax — both provincial and municipal. Toronto’s land transfer tax is calculated the same way as the provincial one.

Purchase priceMarginal tax rate
Up to $55,0000.5%
$55,001 to $250,0001%
$250,001 to $400,0001.5%
$400,001 to $2,000,0002%
$2,000,001 and up2.5%

Toronto first-time homebuyer land transfer tax rebate

In addition to the provincial land transfer tax refund, first-time homebuyers in Toronto may qualify for a municipal land transfer tax rebate of up to $4,475. You can claim the rebate when you register the conveyance, or up to 18 months after the registration date.

To be eligible for Toronto’s land transfer tax rebate for first-time homebuyers, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident
  • You must be at least 18 years old
  • You must live in the home within nine months of buying it
  • You cannot have previously owned a home, or had any ownership interest in a home, anywhere in the world
  • If you have a spouse, your spouse cannot have owned a home anywhere in the world during the time you’ve been married
 
 

British Columbia land transfer tax

British Columbia charges a property transfer tax based on the fair market value of the property on the day the transfer is registered with the Land Title Office.

Foreign nationals, foreign corporations and taxable trustees must pay an additional 20% tax on the price of the property (called the “foreign buyers tax”) if the property is located in the Metro Vancouver District, Fraser Valley Regional District, Capital Regional District, Regional District of Nanaimo or Regional District of Central Okanagan.

Fair market valueMarginal tax rate
Up to $200,0001%
$200,001 to $2,000,0002%
$2,000,001 to $3,000,0003%
$3,000,001 and up5%

British Columbia first-time homebuyer land transfer tax rebate

First-time homebuyers in B.C. may qualify for a partial or full exemption from paying property transfer tax.

To be eligible for a full exemption from B.C.’s property transfer tax, you and your property must meet the following criteria:

  • You must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident
  • You cannot have previously owned a home, or had any ownership interest in a home or property that was your principal residence anywhere in the world
  • You have never received a first time home buyers’ exemption or refund
  • You must have either:
    • Lived in B.C. for at least a year immediately before the date you register the property
    • Filed at least two income tax returns as a B.C. resident in the last six taxation years immediately before the registration date
  • The property must only be used as your principal residence, and you must move in within 92 days of registering the property
  • The property must have a fair market value of $500,000 or less
  • The property must be 0.5 hectares (1.24 acres) or smaller

You may qualify for a partial exemption from the tax if the property:

  • Has a fair market value less than $525,000
  • Is larger than 0.5 hectares
  • Has another building on the property other than the principal residence
 

Alberta land transfer and mortgage registration fees

Alberta doesn’t charge a land transfer tax. Instead, it charges homebuyers a land transfer registration fee and mortgage registration fee. Here’s how the fees are calculated:

Land transfer registration fee:

$50 base, plus $2 for every $5,000 of the property’s fair market value.

Mortgage registration fee:

$50 base, plus $1.50 for every $5,000 of mortgage amount.

 
 

Saskatchewan land title fee

Like Alberta, Saskatchewan doesn’t charge a land transfer tax. However, it does charge a land title transfer fee based on the price of the property.

Property valueLand title transfer fee
Up to $500No fee
$501 to $8,400$25
$8,401 and up$0.3% of purchase price
 

Manitoba land transfer tax

Like other provinces, Manitoba charges a marginal tax rate on different brackets of the property’s purchase price. The tax is based on the fair market value of the property on the day the transfer is registered.

Fair market valueMarginal tax rate
Up to $30,000No tax
$30,001 to $90,0000.5%
$90,001 to $150,0001%
$150,001 to $200,0001.5%
$200,001 and up2%
 
 

Quebec land transfer tax

Quebec charges one of two types of land transfer tax depending on whether a home is located in the city in Montreal, or the rest of Quebec.

There are two steps to calculate Quebec’s transfer duties. First, you have to figure out the property value. The property value is the greatest of the following amounts:

  • The property’s purchase price, excluding Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Quebec Sales Tax (QST)
  • The price listed in the deed of sale
  • The market value listed on the property assessment roll, multiplied by a comparative factor (for 2021, the comparative factor is 1.06)

Based on that amount, here’s how Quebec’s land transfer tax is calculated for homes outside of Montreal:

Property valueMarginal tax rate
Up to $52,8000.5%
$52,801 to $264,0001%
$264,001 and up1.5%
 

Montreal land transfer tax

There are additional land transfer tax brackets for homes within Montreal. First, follow the same steps outlined above to determine the property value.

Based on that amount, here’s how Montreal’s land transfer tax is calculated:

Property valueMarginal tax rate
Up to $52,8000.5%
$52,801 to $264,0001%
$264,001 to $527,9001.5%
$527,901 to $1,055,8002%
$1,055,801 to $2,041,9002.5%
$2,041,900 and up3%
 
 

New Brunswick real property transfer tax

New Brunswick’s land transfer tax is pretty simple to calculate: it’s 1% of the assessed value of the property. For example, if you buy a home assessed to be worth $200,000, you would pay $2,000 in property transfer tax.

 

Prince Edward Island real property transfer tax

P.E.I doesn’t charge land transfer tax on properties valued at less than $30,000. For properties above that threshold, the real property transfer tax is calculated at 1% of the purchase price or property value, whichever is greater.

Prince Edward Island first-time homebuyer land transfer tax exemption

P.E.I waives the real property transfer tax for certain first-time homebuyers. To qualify, you must meet the following criteria:

  • You must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident
  • You must be at least 18 years old
  • You cannot have previously owned a home, or had any ownership interest in a home, anywhere in the world, that constituted a principal residence
  • You intend to occupy the property as your principal residence
  • You have not previously obtained a first-time home buyer exemption
  • You have either:
    • Maintained a principal residence in P.E.I for at least six months immediately prior to buying your home, or
    • Filed income tax returns as a resident of P.E.I at least two times in the last six years
 
 

Nova Scotia land transfer tax

In Nova Scotia, homebuyers pay a municipal deed transfer tax. The tax rate depends on the municipality where your home is located. Kentville is the only town in the province that doesn’t charge a municipal deed transfer tax.

There are nearly 50 municipalities across Nova Scotia that charge municipal deed transfer tax ranging from 0.5% to 1.5% of the property’s purchase price. Here are a few examples of deed transfer tax rates in Nova Scotia’s most populous communities.

Deed transfer tax rate

-%

 

Newfoundland and Labrador land transfer tax

Newfoundland and Labrador’s land transfer tax is called the Registration of Deeds Act, and is calculated the following way:

For properties under $500:

A flat fee of $100

For properties over $500:

A flat fee of $100, plus 40 cents for every hundred dollars over $500

 
 

Northwest Territories land transfer tax

In Northwest Territories, homebuyers must pay two types of registration fees based on the mortgage amount and the property value.

The mortgage amount is taxed at $1 for every $1,000 or part thereof (minimum charge of $80).

The property value is taxed based on whether the property is valued at more or less than $1 million.

Property valueTax amount
$1 million or less$1.50 for every $1,000 or part thereof (minimum charge of $100)
More than $1 million$1,500 base amount, plus $1 for every $1,000 (or part thereof) greater than $1 million
 

Yukon land transfer tax

The Yukon Territory Land Titles Act charges three types of fees to transfer property.

Fee #1: Assurance fees

An assurance fee is charged when the property’s purchase price is greater than the value of the property at the time of its last transfer. For example, if you buy a property for $150,000 but it was valued at $100,000 the last time it was transferred, you’ll have $50,000 of additional declared value that will be taxed.

Here’s how additional declared value is taxed:

  • $20 for all transactions up to $10,000
  • Add $10 for each $10,000 (or part of) of additional declared value since last transfer

Fee #2: Transfer fees

Next, homebuyers must pay a flat transfer fee based on the price of your property.

Property valueFlat fee
Up to $100,000$50
$100,001 to $500,000$150
$500,001 to $3,000,000$350
$3,000,001 to $10,000,000$550
$10,000,001 and up$750

Fee #3: Mortgage fees

Finally, you’ll also pay a flat fee based on the value of your mortgage.

Mortgage valueFlat fee
Up to $100,000$50
$100,001 to $500,000$100
$500,001 to $1,000,000$200
$1,000,001 to $5,000,000$400
$5,000,001 to $10,000,000$600
$10,000,001 to $20,000,000$800
$20,000,001 and up$1,000
 
 

Nunavut land transfer tax

Nunavut charges a registration fee based on the value of the property:

Properties valued at less than $1 million:

$1.50 for every $1,000 of value (minimum fee of $60)

Properties valued at more than $1 million:

$1,500 base amount, plus $1 for every $1,000 over $1 million

About the author

LowestRates.ca Staff

The LowestRates.ca writing team focuses on telling original stories and bringing you the latest news in the world of personal finance.

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