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5-Year Variable

5.64%

5-Year Fixed

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Compare the best mortgage rates in Alberta

We know that hunting for the best mortgage rates in Alberta can be a challenge.

Don’t worry — we’re here to save you time during your search for cheap mortgage rates in Alberta, and to save you money on your mortgage payments. LowestRates.ca brings Albertans the best mortgage rates from the 50+ banks and brokers across Canada.

Our free, no-obligation service does the legwork by comparing the market and bringing you a selection of the lowest rates currently offered in your area. In just a few minutes, you can see who has the best mortgage rates in Alberta on any given day.

Keep reading to learn more about the state of Alberta’s housing market and how you can benefit from comparing Alberta mortgage rates on LowestRates.ca.

The best current mortgage rates in Canada

Check out today's best mortgage rates in Canada by type and term.

Rates are based on an average mortgage of $300,000
 Insured ?

The rates in this column apply to borrowers who have purchased mortgage default insurance. This is required when you purchase a home with less than a 20% down payment. The home must be owner-occupied and the amortization must be 25 years or less.

80% LTV ?

The rates in this column apply to mortgage amounts between 65.01% and 80% of the property value. The home must be owner-occupied and have an amortization of 25 years or less. You must have purchased it for less than $1 million. These rates are not available on refinances. Refinances require "Uninsured" rates.

65% LTV ?

The rates in this column apply to mortgage amounts that are 65% of the property value or less. The home must be owner-occupied and have an amortization of 25 years or less. You must have purchased it for less than $1 million. These rates are not available on refinances. Refinances require "Uninsured" rates.

Uninsured ?

The rates in this column apply to purchases over $1 million, refinances and amortizations over 25 years. More info on the differences between insured and uninsured rates.

Bank Rate ?

Bank Rate is the mortgage interest rate posted by the big banks in Canada.

 
1-year fixed rate
Insured
6.44%
80% LTV
5.49%
65% LTV
5.49%
Uninsured
6.19%
7.25%
 
2-year fixed rate
Insured
5.15%
80% LTV
5.45%
65% LTV
5.45%
Uninsured
6.34%
7.09%
 
3-year fixed rate
Insured
5.29%
80% LTV
5.3%
65% LTV
5.3%
Uninsured
5.79%
6.7%
 
4-year fixed rate
Insured
5.39%
80% LTV
5.3%
65% LTV
5.3%
Uninsured
5.54%
6.29%
 
5-year fixed rate
Insured
5.19%
80% LTV
4.99%
65% LTV
4.99%
Uninsured
5.34%
5.74%
 
7-year fixed rate
Insured
5.59%
80% LTV
5.84%
65% LTV
5.84%
Uninsured
5.99%
6.39%
 
10-year fixed rate
Insured
5.29%
80% LTV
6%
65% LTV
6%
Uninsured
6%
7.25%
 
3-year variable rate
Insured
6.1%
80% LTV
6.4%
65% LTV
6.4%
Uninsured
6.1%
8.6%
 
5-year variable rate
Insured
5.95%
80% LTV
6.1%
65% LTV
6.1%
Uninsured
6.1%
6.7%
 
HELOC rate
Insured
7.2%
80% LTV
7.2%
65% LTV
7.2%
Uninsured
7.2%
N/A
 
Stress test
Insured
5.99%
80% LTV
6.89%
65% LTV
6.89%
Uninsured
6.99%
N/A

Variable Rates

As low as

6.05%

Fixed Rates

As low as

5.64%

Cha-ching! Our rates are always lower than the posted bank rates.

Current lowest posted bank rate

7.49%

Alberta mortgage restrictions & regulations

Mortgage rates in Alberta are determined much as they are in the rest of the country. A generation ago, it wasn’t uncommon to see mortgage rates top double digits. But for a good portion of the last decade, the rates have remained historically low. Unfortunately for current mortgage holders and those seeking to buy a home, rates have been on the upswing as inflation has remained high.

Variable Mortgage Rates

Variable mortgage rates are determined by commercial banks’ prime rates, which are mainly swayed by the Bank of Canada’s key interest rate. That means an increase in the key interest rate almost automatically leads to a similar increase in variable mortgage rates. The Bank of Canada will typically raise its key interest rate in an effort to combat inflation, which is exactly what has been happening over the past several months.

Fixed Mortgage Rates

Fixed rate mortgage loans are primarily influenced by the yield on Canadian government bonds (bond yields) of corresponding maturity. The correlation between the fixed rates and the yield on five-year Canadian government bonds is almost a near match. This is the case because bond rates represent the benchmark for financial institutions’ cost of funds.

What is mortgage default insurance?

Mortgage default insurance is a protection for the lender if you don't (or can’t) make your mortgage payments. It's required for all mortgages where the down payment is less than 20% of the purchase price.

Often it's added to the mortgage, so you pay for it over the life of the mortgage—and you pay interest on it, too.

Some lenders ask you to make a separate lump-sum payment for the cost of the insurance.

You can find out more by using the LowesRates.ca Mortgage Default Insurance Calculator.

Factors that affect your Alberta mortgage rate

So, what’s considered the “average” mortgage rate in Alberta? There isn’t necessarily one answer. A number of factors go into determining what interest rate Alberta lenders may offer you on your mortgage. These include the size of your down payment and the amount of debt you owe. Though Alberta mortgage rates in 2021 are at the lowest they’ve been in a long time, it’s crucial to understand what lenders look for when they evaluate mortgage applications.

Read More

The main differences between conventional and high-ratio mortgages in Alberta.

You can get quotes for a number of different mortgage products on LowestRates.ca, but the two main types are conventional and high-ratio mortgages. The key difference between the two is whether you’re able to put down at least 20% of the home’s purchase price.

Conventional mortgages refer to mortgages with a down payment of at least 20%. High-ratio mortgages refer to those with a down payment of less than 20%, which means homebuyers need to purchase mortgage insurance from the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). If you default on your mortgage loan, CMHC insurance protects the lender. The 20% down payment rule for mortgages is standard across Canada.

Keep in mind that high-ratio mortgage rates are often lower because these mortgages are insured by the CMHC — but you’re also paying for additional mortgage insurance. On the other hand, contributing a down payment of more than 20% will reduce the overall amount of your mortgage.

Conventional 5-year fixed mortgage rates vs. high ratio 5-year fixed mortgage rates in Alberta

DateAverage Conventional RateAverage High Ratio Rate
09/22 4.70%4.38%
10/22 5.06%4.74%
11/22 5.43%5.19%
12/22 5.19%4.81%
01/23 5.17%4.73%
02/23 5.08%4.65%
03/23 5.07%4.71%
04/23 4.77%4.46%
05/23 4.85%4.54%
06/23 5.22%4.90%
07/23 5.46%5.14%
08/23 5.75%5.38%

Last Updated: September 1, 2023

The main differences between fixed rate and variable rate mortgages in Alberta.

Customers can complete a quote for either a variable mortgage rate or a fixed mortgage rate on LowestRates.ca. One isn’t better than the other — it all depends on your tolerance for risk, as variable rates may change, and which option gives you more savings at the time you’re looking to buy a home.

A fixed rate stays the same throughout the entire term of your mortgage, meaning you can expect to pay the same amount of interest on each payment. By contrast, a variable rate can fluctuate, depending on the state of the market. When the rate on a variable mortgage increases, more of your payment will go towards the interest. Conversely, more of your payment will be applied to the principal when the rate decreases. Variables rates are linked to your lender’s prime rate, which, in turn, fluctuates based on the Bank of Canada rate.

A fixed-rate mortgage is usually more expensive than a variable-rate mortgage but is also considered a safer bet during periods of rising interest rates.

5-year fixed vs. 5-year variable mortgage rates in Alberta

MonthFixedVariable
09/22 4.56%4.16%
10/22 5.00%4.56%
11/22 5.23%5.02%
12/22 4.94%5.29%
01/23 4.85%5.62%
02/23 4.82%5.87%
03/23 4.88%5.87%
04/23 4.61%5.89%
05/23 4.63%5.93%
06/23 5.02%6.08%
07/23 5.29%6.28%
08/23 5.53%6.40%

Last Updated: September 1, 2023

Average value of new mortgage loans.

There has been a significant drop in average mortgage values across Canada, and Alberta is no exception. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the housing market went hot, and prices saw a significant hike, which has led to an equally significant increase in mortgage values across the country, fueled by low interest rates.

Now that the market is cooling, the values are dropping off. That said, Alberta won’t be as heavily impacted by this as the rest of Canada. In the last year, Canada’s average mortgage values peaked at $366,163 in Q2 of 2022 and Alberta’s at $339,854 in Q3 of 2022. As of Q1 of 2023, the average values have dropped from their peak levels by 12.5% and 8.8%, to $320,298 and $310,027, respectively.

One of the reasons for this drop on the national scale is the increase in interest rates, which has led to lower home sales overall, and consequently, lower prices. As for Alberta itself, it has lagged behind provinces like Ontario and British Columbia in terms of home prices, which is why the decrease in mortgage values hasn’t been as significant here. Ontario peaked at $462,701 and went down 12.1% to $406,421, while British Columbia peaked at $491,960 and went down 12.7% to $429,370 – more in line with the national drop than Alberta’s. Overall, the values are higher than they were before the pandemic, but lower than they were when home sales peaked, indicating that home prices continue to rise, but at a steadier rate.

This means that homes are more affordable than they were in the last few years. That said, mortgage rates are a bit of a wildcard in 2023, so if you’re not in a rush to buy a home, it might be worth waiting.

 Q1 - 2022Q2 - 2022Q3 - 2022Q4 - 2022Q1 - 2023
Canada
Q1 - 2022
$361,001
Q2 - 2022
$366,163
Q3 - 2022
$363,654
Q4 - 2022
$325,612
Q1 - 2023
$320,298
Newfoundland
Q1 - 2022
$214,003
Q2 - 2022
$219,188
Q3 - 2022
$232,851
Q4 - 2022
$216,426
Q1 - 2023
$214,277
Prince Edward Island
Q1 - 2022
$242,214
Q2 - 2022
$244,884
Q3 - 2022
$251,957
Q4 - 2022
$253,908
Q1 - 2023
$231,844
Nova Scotia
Q1 - 2022
$240,473
Q2 - 2022
$250,006
Q3 - 2022
$258,677
Q4 - 2022
$237,381
Q1 - 2023
$227,788
New Brunswick
Q1 - 2022
$179,304
Q2 - 2022
$188,394
Q3 - 2022
$203,216
Q4 - 2022
$186,699
Q1 - 2023
$182,986
Quebec
Q1 - 2022
$224,133
Q2 - 2022
$228,524
Q3 - 2022
$237,520
Q4 - 2022
$206,201
Q1 - 2023
$202,014
Ontario
Q1 - 2022
$448,031
Q2 - 2022
$462,494
Q3 - 2022
$462,701
Q4 - 2022
$418,808
Q1 - 2023
$406,421
Manitoba
Q1 - 2022
$247,682
Q2 - 2022
$255,490
Q3 - 2022
$272,728
Q4 - 2022
$251,420
Q1 - 2023
$237,080
Saskatchewan
Q1 - 2022
$251,715
Q2 - 2022
$243,338
Q3 - 2022
$260,163
Q4 - 2022
$240,763
Q1 - 2023
$232,458
Alberta
Q1 - 2022
$319,728
Q2 - 2022
$331,285
Q3 - 2022
$339,854
Q4 - 2022
$317,359
Q1 - 2023
$310,027
British Columbia
Q1 - 2022
$484,941
Q2 - 2022
$491,960
Q3 - 2022
$487,366
Q4 - 2022
$439,719
Q1 - 2023
$429,370

Source: Canadian Housing and Mortgage Corporation

Average mortgage monthly payment in Alberta

Average mortgage monthly payments have seen a steady increase between 2022 and 2023, without any sudden spikes or dips. That said, the quarter-on-quarter (QoQ) rate at which the increase has been occurring did see a spike in the middle of 2022, up from 2.8% to 8.5% in Q2 and to 12.4% in Q3.

The increase in Q4 has been far less significant – only 3.1% – and even less so going into Q1 of 2023, which was 2.7%. From year-over-year perspective, there was in fact a slight drop – 2.8% in Q1 of 2022 to 2.7% in Q1 of 2023. This aligns with the average mortgage loan increases in Q2 and Q3 in 2022 and the return to lower values in 2023, implying that the spike largely stems from that.

 Monthly mortgage payment% change (QoQ)
Q1 – 2022$1,476+2.8%
Q2 – 2022$1,476+8.5%
Q3 – 2022$1,800+12.4%
Q4 – 2022$1,856+3.1%
Q1 – 2023$1,907+2.7%

Source: Canadian Housing and Mortgage Corporation

Alberta mortgage performance

One of the ways to gauge mortgage performance is by examining delinquency rates, which, if high or on the rise, are a good indicator that the economic health of a country, province or financial institution isn’t in a great place.

What is delinquency? In the financial world, it’s a situation in which a borrower fails to make a payment on their debt by a specific due date (usually missing it by 30 days). A delinquency rate is thus the percentage of loans that are past due. In this case, mortgage loans.

It’s important to note that ‘delinquency’ isn’t the same as ‘defaulting,’ which occurs when a borrower is unable to keep up with their loan payments altogether.

Alberta has some of the highest mortgage delinquency rates in the country, behind only Saskatchewan and Newfoundland. In Q1 of 2023, for instance, Alberta’s rate was 0.30%, well above the national rate of 0.15%. This isn’t exactly new, as Alberta’s economy has always had certain volatility to it due to changing oil prices.

What’s interesting, however, is that despite high mortgage loan values in Q2 and Q3 of 2022, the delinquency rates in Alberta have actually gone down – and continued to do so well into Q1 of 2023 – despite rising interest rates and inflation. A similar phenomenon has occurred nationwide, though in most provinces, the delinquency rates have simply remained flat.

So, what has prevented mortgage delinquency rates from budging in the wrong direction throughout 2022? Longer amortization periods and shorter-term fixed-rate mortgages are part of the answer. The other part is Canada’s relatively low unemployment, which has allowed many Canadians to keep up with their payments.

There is strong indication, however, that mortgage delinquency rates will start rising throughout Canada, as they are already doing so in other forms of debt, such as credit cards, due to inflation and increasing costs. This would further lower the demand and potentially make homes slightly more affordable.

Canadian delinquency rates from Q1 2022 to Q1 2023

 Q1 - 2022Q2 - 2022Q3 - 2022Q4 - 2022Q1 - 2023
Canada
Q1 - 2022
0.17%
Q2 - 2022
0.15%
Q3 - 2022
0.14%
Q4 - 2022
0.14%
Q1 - 2023
0.15%
Newfoundland
Q1 - 2022
0.40%
Q2 - 2022
0.35%
Q3 - 2022
0.31%
Q4 - 2022
0.34%
Q1 - 2023
0.37%
Prince Edward Island
Q1 - 2022
0.15%
Q2 - 2022
0.14%
Q3 - 2022
0.13%
Q4 - 2022
0.13%
Q1 - 2023
0.11%
Nova Scotia
Q1 - 2022
0.24%
Q2 - 2022
0.22%
Q3 - 2022
0.23%
Q4 - 2022
0.22%
Q1 - 2023
0.22%
New Brunswick
Q1 - 2022
0.25%
Q2 - 2022
0.23%
Q3 - 2022
0.23%
Q4 - 2022
0.23%
Q1 - 2023
0.23%
Québec
Q1 - 2022
0.17%
Q2 - 2022
0.15%
Q3 - 2022
0.13%
Q4 - 2022
0.12%
Q1 - 2023
0.13%
Ontario
Q1 - 2022
0.07%
Q2 - 2022
0.07%
Q3 - 2022
0.07%
Q4 - 2022
0.08%
Q1 - 2023
0.09%
Manitoba
Q1 - 2022
0.22%
Q2 - 2022
0.20%
Q3 - 2022
0.20%
Q4 - 2022
0.20%
Q1 - 2023
0.21%
Saskatchewan
Q1 - 2022
0.50%
Q2 - 2022
0.50%
Q3 - 2022
0.52%
Q4 - 2022
0.51%
Q1 - 2023
0.51%
Alberta
Q1 - 2022
0.37%
Q2 - 2022
0.34%
Q3 - 2022
0.31%
Q4 - 2022
0.30%
Q1 - 2023
0.30%
British Columbia
Q1 - 2022
0.11%
Q2 - 2022
0.10%
Q3 - 2022
0.10%
Q4 - 2022
0.10%
Q1 - 2023
0.11%

Source: Canadian Housing and Mortgage Corporation

Current Alberta housing market and home prices.

Much like the weather outside, the current Alberta housing market is cooling. For example, in larger cities like Edmonton, total residential unit sales for October decreased 6.7% compared to September 2022 and saw a year-over-year decrease of 21% since last October.

In Calgary, new listings have trended down, however, as opposed to Edmonton, with sales of 1,857 units in October, levels are strong and year-to-date sales have reached 26,823. Still, sales growth in the over $700,000 price range in October were not enough to offset the declines in the lower-price ranges, causing detached sales to ease by over 29% compared to last year.

Alberta closing costs and land transfer tax.

When you buy a property in Alberta (and the land it rests on), you must pay a tax to the government after the transaction is completed. The amount you pay depends on the value of your property, but almost always forms the largest portion of your closing costs.

Alberta does not charge a land transfer tax. However, you will be charged a property registration fee.

The property registration fee has two components:

Your total registration fee is the sum of the two fees above. In our calculations, we assume a 20% down payment.

First-time homebuyers in Alberta.

First-time home buyers who acquire a qualifying home can claim a non-refundable tax credit of up to $750 from the federal government . The value of the HBTC is calculated by multiplying $5,000 by the lowest personal income tax rate (15% in 2022).

The government of Alberta used to offer the Public Essential and Key Workforce (PEAK) program, which helped low-income households get a second mortgage to fund a downpayment on their first home, but the program closed in recent years as the available inventory for the project was depleted.

Calgary and Edmonton have their own local programs.

The First Place Program in Edmonton works with banks and builders to develop empty surplus school building sites into townhomes, and helps new owners lower their up-front costs and build equity.

As part of the program, eligible buyers are given a 5-year deferral on land costs. Buyers pay for the cost of the unit, condominium fees, taxes, and utility costs. After the five years is up, the owner has to pay the City the total amount of the deferred land costs.

Attainable Homes Calgary (AHC) is a non-profit social enterprise, created and owned by The City of Calgary, that works to help moderate-income Calgarians become homeowners. The program loans eligible applicants the difference.

The program helps eligible applicants with a down payment of just $2,000, loaning the remainder of the down payment with zero interest on the loan. In exchange, AHC receives a portion of your home’s appreciation, starting from 100% in the first year of ownership, to 25% after five years. The down payment loan does not require a minimum number of years that you need to live in the home, however you will need to repay the down payment loan in full when you move out, plus the cost of a home appraisal, and any appreciation owed on the home.

*Based on the difference between estimated deep-discount 5-year fixed rates from Canada's top six banks and the lowest comparable rates on LowestRates.ca, as of January 14, 2022.

Frequently asked questions about mortgages in Alberta.

How can I qualify for a mortgage in Alberta?

It’s important to have a good credit score. Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation says the credit score requirement on insured mortgages should be 680.

Other factors you should have in order can include:

  • Paying down debt – This can do a few things. Paying debt frees up resources to put towards your downpayment or mortgage. It also indicates to lenders that you are a “good risk” and have the ability (and desire) to pay loans in a responsible manner.
  • Calculating assets and liabilities – If knowledge is power, then understanding your economic situation will help you obtain the mortgage you need. By having a complete picture of assets and liabilities, you will be better prepared to provide the information lenders require to decide on your mortgage application. This can be done with an accountant, if you have one, or on your own.
  • Having a consistent employment history – Lenders want to see elements of your financial life that reduce risk. Being employed consistently indicates your ability to be financially responsible. This will be an important factor in indicating to lenders that you can pay your debts with little to no risk of default.
  • Having a large downpayment -- The more you save towards the purchase of a house, the better you will be in the long-run in terms of debt burdens. However, lenders also see this as a lower-risk proposition. The less you need to borrow, the quicker they can get their money back if you default on the loan. Monthly costs are reduced for you, and you look more attractive to lenders who are all about reducing their own risk.
  • Most importantly is proving you can carry the mortgage, usually calculated by your broker or mortgage agent using a debt service ratio analysis.

Should I use a mortgage broker in Alberta?

Unlike a bank, a mortgage broker can only offer mortgages from their line of products. They can access many lenders and help you choose the right product for your circumstance. The good news is that mortgage brokers are free to use and are paid by the lender while also having access to a variety of lender interest rates. LowestRates.ca can help you navigate and compare rates and direct you to the broker that best suits your Alberta mortgage rate needs.

What’s the difference between a mortgage term and an amortization period?

Some people use the word “term” interchangeably with “amortization period” when discussing mortgages, but the two refer to entirely separate things.

Mortgage term: The time in which the interest rate agreed to by you and your lender remains in effect. Once the term ends, you can renew your mortgage contract at a new rate. Mortgage terms vary in length. For example, you can look for 6 month mortgage rates in Alberta, or in yearly increments up to 10 years. The most popular term in Canada is 5 years. In general, the longer the term of your mortgage, the higher the rate you can expect to pay.

Amortization period: The length of time it will take for you to pay off your mortgage in full, both the principal and interest. The maximum amortization period allowed in Canada is 35 years. However, it’s only available for homebuyers who contribute a down payment of at least 20% (and are thus not obligated to purchase CMHC mortgage insurance). Homebuyers who put down less than 20% can only acquire a mortgage with a maximum amortization period of 25 years. A 5-year fixed term with a 25-year amortization period is the most popular combination in Canada.

What’s the difference between an open mortgage vs. a closed mortgage?

Understanding the difference between an open mortgage and a closed mortgage is crucial, especially if you’re keen on having flexibility in your payment schedule.

Open mortgage: An open mortgage provides Alberta homebuyers with the option to pay off the entire mortgage balance at any time without incurring a penalty. Open mortgages are ideal for homeowners who wish to pay off debts quickly and have the financial resources to do so, as well as those who expect to live in their home for only a brief period before selling it. Open mortgage rates charged by Alberta banks are generally higher than the rates on closed mortgages, which is something to keep in mind if your goal is to keep your payments low.

Closed mortgage: A closed mortgage commits you to making regular fixed payments for the duration of the mortgage term. If you wish to pay off your mortgage before the term ends or refinance to take advantage of lower rates, you’ll be charged a penalty. The penalty can be substantial, particularly if you’ve opted for a fixed-rate mortgage. The rates on closed mortgages in Alberta are typically lower than those on open mortgages. To compensate for the rigidity of a closed mortgage, most lenders permit homeowners to make extra payments up to a predetermined maximum without penalty.

How much does it cost to live in Alberta?

The cost of living in Alberta varies and will depend on the lifestyle you wish to lead. There are some key factors you need to take into consideration if you’re thinking about relocating to Alberta.

Alberta’s economy is heavily dependent on the energy and forestry industries. Known as “Canada’s energy province,” it provides ample employment opportunities and boasts a high standard of living. The average income is also the highest in the country. However, due to the cyclical nature of the energy industry, the economy is also overly sensitive to recessions and, as a result, can experience periods of high unemployment (the unemployment rate as of January 2021 is 10.7%).

There’s no provincial sales tax in Alberta, and it has one of the lowest income tax rates in Canada, which means more disposable income in your pocket.

Alberta offers some of the country’s most affordable housing. Renting an apartment is also cheap compared with other provinces, making the province a great place to live if you’re firm on keeping your housing costs low. As with most of Canada, fixed and variable mortgage rates are falling in Alberta, making the province an ideal place to live without putting a strain on your wallet.

When it comes to car insurance, Alberta’s premiums are among the highest in Canada. The cost of home insurance is also significant, with Albertans paying the country's second-highest rates.

How much does getting a lower interest rate matter in Alberta?

Getting the lowest mortgage rate is just one factor. The flexibility of your mortgage contract is something to be aware of during negotiations. Features such as prepayment privileges, penalties and portability can make a big difference. After all, this is a decades-long commitment.

Prepayment privileges: What if you want to pay off your mortgage early? Not all banks and lenders offer the same prepayment terms, so it’s important to address this early in your negotiations if it’s important to you.

Penalties: If you ever need to break your mortgage, you may wind up paying thousands of dollars in penalties. To avoid getting caught off guard, it’s important to discuss penalties early in the negotiation process.

Portability: It’s possible you won’t live in your current house for the full duration of your amortization period. This is where mortgage portability comes in. A portable mortgage is one that can be transferred to a new home and combined with an additional mortgage loan.

What is a mortgage rate hold?

A mortgage rate hold or rate lock allows buyers a guaranteed interest rate on their mortgage for a set period (usually 30 to 60 days but up to a maximum of 120 days). It is usually used when a buyer knows they will be purchasing or refinancing their home soon.

What are prepayment options?

Prepayment options allow you to repay your mortgage sooner than the original payment schedule. There are two ways to do this – increase your mortgage payments or pay a lump sum.

Is it safe to get a mortgage online?

Yes, it’s safe — you no longer need to visit a bank branch or mortgage broker’s office in person to apply for a mortgage in Alberta, or across Canada. It’s becoming increasingly common for Canadians to apply for mortgages online. LowestRates.ca only works with reputable, trustworthy financial institutions. Your credit score won’t be affected and your information is secure. We don’t share your information with anyone unless you want to connect with a mortgage broker. We take care of the heavy lifting by comparing the market for you and can connect you with the best mortgage lenders in the country.

How do I know I’m getting the lowest rate?

We have a strong selection of lenders on LowestRates.ca including the big banks and many independent providers and we’re adding more lenders all the time. This ensures we’re always delivering you a competitive rate. Even if you’re not ready to commit to anything, you can use our site as a starting point for research (it’s totally free, and you’re under no obligation).

The better informed you are, the more likely you'll negotiate a better deal for yourself. And, really, that’s what we care about the most.

Why the best mortgage rate in Alberta will be different than the best mortgage rate in other part of Canada?

Mortgage rates in Alberta can fluctuate depending on size of population, home styles, neighbourhood values and a host of other reasons. Simply put, greater competitive pressure in Canada's hottest real estate markets (especially Vancouver and Toronto) translates into cheaper mortgage rates. Ontario is the most competitive by a long shot, with 113 lenders publicly advertising mortgage rates (not including brokers).

Also, different lenders have different overhead costs they have to consider. They also have to consider the borrower's financial situation, including their debt-to-income ratio, credit score and down payment. To find the best mortgage rate, you need to find the right lender through sites like LowestRates.ca.

LowestRates.ca Staff

LowestRates.ca Staff

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The LowestRates.ca writing team focuses on telling original stories.

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